Thursday, August 30, 2012

Mama Loves Glamping

When I wrote my last camping story on our camping style, I was torn between our real style and what I wish our style could be. We just took a tour around the Kootenay Rockies of British Columbia, through the Okanagan, and home through Mt. Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks.  We didn't stay in a tent once.  We did however glamp in a lakeside yurt in Nakusp and stayed in a camping cabin at Canyon Hotsprings.  The rest of the time I have to confess we stayed in lakeside motels since it was a vacation after all. 

Rock Island Resort's Yurt

Glamping is the term being used for luxurious camping that's very far from the traditional idea of "roughing it in the woods."  Fans of glamping might stay in yurts, tepees, raised tents that sit off the ground, tree houses, cabins, and even comfort RVs.  Alberta Parks are even jumping on board with comfort camping options available in a few of their provincial parks.  Search the Discover Camping website for British Columbia and you will also find yurts or cabins located in several of their campgrounds. 

We enjoyed true comfort in our yurt at Rock Island Resort, Nakusp.  We had a full kitchen along with a barbecue for our meals, we had a comfortable queen sized bed and a futon bed for our son, we had a fancy composting toilet, and best of all we had a fire pit with wood right on the lake.  We lit a fire and sat beside the lake watching the sun go down in complete privacy.  The resort has two other cabins but the yurt sits alone in a private little forest of trees.  Even at the lake you are well separated from the cabins.  (read, this would be an awesome place for a romantic retreat!)  On our second night we were treated to a meteor shower and got to see many stars shooting across the sky.  You don't get experiences like this every day!

The kitchen

Bedroom/kitchen - as you can see, it's a very open concept (great for a small family)

What it looks like when you open your eyes in the morning and look up

Evening on Upper Arrow Lake

The highlight of staying at the yurt was being able to take the resort's tandem kayak out on Upper Arrow Lake for morning and evening paddles with our son.  It was a brand new experience for all three of us.  We had been canoeing before but none of us had ever ridden in a kayak.  And it should be mentioned that kayaking has been on my to do list for pretty much every vacation we've ever taken!  This was the first time were the stars aligned and we got the opportunity to try the sport.  Our opinion?  Awesome!!  Our son didn't stop talking about kayaking the whole way home.  Every lake we passed, we'd hear "go kayak" from the backseat. 

Hard to get kayaking photos when there's nobody else with you so this is it.

Bringing the kayak in from our paddle

Now while we would love to buy a kayak we are realistic in the knowledge that we've had no lessons, we have no experience, and that taking a child with you on adventures when you are a beginner to the sport just might not be the smartest thing to do.  Therefore, after enjoying our backcountry canoe trip  this summer as well, we decided to buy a canoe.  It's a 16 foot lake canoe and will nicely fit the three of us on all our future paddling adventures.  We already took it out last weekend here in Calgary and it tracks beautifully.  It's also rock solid for stability and didn't fill tipsy at all when we encountered some rough water on the Glenmore Reservoir. 

Our new canoe on our first trip out at the Glenmore Reservoir - paddled all the way to the Weaselhead and back

From the comfort of our yurt, we were also able to explore the local area of Nakusp.  We explored the town beach, swam in the lake, played in the sand, and did a balance bike tour of the waterfront pathway.  We found an awesome playground right near the beach (the Rotary Club should be commended on their playgrounds!  They are always the best ones in any town!!).

Biking along the waterfront path

The Rotary Playground

Throwing rocks in the lake

Playing at the town beach

I also found my new favourite Hot Springs Resort while in Nakusp.  To know me is to know that I hate crowds.  I love hotsprings but I really don't like sharing them with tons of speedo wearing strangers.  Enter the Nakusp Hotsprings - isolated, quiet, and a local secret perhaps?  We got there early so that we were the first people in the pool.  After an hour there were still only a handful of people in the pools with us.  It was magical and I'll skip the popular resorts of Ainsworth and Halcyon in future trips.  We did visit Ainsworth but it wasn't very peaceful or restful.  They don't even provide chairs to lounge beside the pool in.  Nakusp however has beautiful loungers all along the pool for bathing in the mid-day sun.

Nakusp Hotsprings

Sunbathing at the hotsprings


A final thing I have to recommend if you're in the area is the Cedar Grove hiking trail.  We stopped for the short easy walk on our way to Nakusp from the village of Kaslo.   It's located just off Hwy 31A  at Retallack on the left hand side (approx. 30 minutes west of Kaslo).  We stopped in at the tourism info centre in Kaslo to get information and maps.  They were very helpful and provided plenty of suggestions for our next visit as well.

The Cedar  Grove Trail

Hiking through the Old Growth Cedar Forest


We only spent two nights in Nakusp but could have easily spent a week in the area.  I have a pile of tourism magazines here beside me with hiking trails and sites circled for next year.  We can't wait to return with our canoe and our new stand up paddle board (check back later for our Okanagan adventures story for more details on how this mountain mama is becoming a true paddling chick). 

A final photo from Kootenay Lake at the Kootenay Bay Ferry Crossing


I'd love to hear about your glamping experiences and suggestions on where we should go for our next glamping adventure.





Sunday, August 26, 2012

Wenger by Eco Bottle - Review

I was asked if I'd like to try out the new Wenger by Eco Bottle water bottles a couple months ago and I responded enthusiastically because I'm always searching for the perfect water bottle.  In my opinion, there was no such thing as a truly awesome water bottle.  They either leaked, tasted like cheap plastic, failed to keep my water cold, or were just plain hard to open and close quickly.

My water bottles have to be able to perform!  When I'm in the middle of a fitness class I need a bottle that I can get water out of very quickly!  I only have a few seconds between songs in my Zumba classes and don't have time to fiddle with a finicky screw top cap.  If it takes too long to get the lid or stopper off and back on secure, it's in the garbage on my way out of the gym.  I had one cheap bottle where I could never quite line the threads up to get the stopper screwed on correctly.  It would  get bumped over in class and water would gush everywhere.  That doesn't make you very popular when there's water all over the dance floor.

I've had bottles leak so badly that my backpack quickly became soaked on day hikes.  My son's Camelbak water bottle leaks so badly that he can't bend over to pick up a stick on a hike without water running down his pants.  The mesh bag on his backpack is soaked within half an hour on every hike we do.  I've started carrying juice boxes and leaving his expensive but crappy bottle at home.

Then there's my pet peeve with the wide mouthed Nalgene bottles.  They are awesome bottles and they will always come with us on our backcountry trips because of the amount of liquid they can carry.  Few bottles can carry a full Litre of water and be so incredibly light.  However, I always get drips all over me from the lids!  Try drinking wine out of one without getting red drops down your shirt or jacket.  It could be said that maybe it's time to find a new way to carry my wine into the backcountry (or at least bring a plastic glass to drink it out of) but I've also transported smoothies in them and ended up with milk all over my shirt - again from the drippy lid.  If you've used a Nalgene bottle you know what I mean.  The lid collects liquid and unless you hold the lid flat in your hand while you drink, that liquid is going to go somewhere.

Enter the Cadillac of Water Bottles:  The Wenger by Eco Bottle!  Every problem with water bottles I've ever had has been solved.  They have different kinds of water bottles and I was sent both an 800ml (27oz) sport top bottle along with a 650ml (22oz) dual top water bottle. I can't really give a positive review for the sport top bottle out of personal preference.  I prefer to drink more openly out of a water bottle rather than sucking my water out in tiny sips.  I know many people who like sport top bottles and if you do, I'm sure you'd love this water bottle.  Myself, I found I really had to suck to get the water out of the bottle and I only tried it once as a result. 

The Dual top bottle is a whole different story.  I have carried this bottle everywhere with me since the first hike I took it on.  I don't think I'd ever be able to find such an amazing water bottle and I've been raving about it to all of my friends.  I think it's shining moment was when we came back to our vehicles after a very hot weekend in the backcountry and everybody was dying for cold water.  I had left my Wenger by Eco Bottle in the car filled with water from the drive out to the mountains.  I grabbed it and the water was still refrigerator cold!  It had sat in a hot car for two days in +30C temperatures and stayed cold.  I wanted to get on my knees and say, "All hail the most amazing water bottle ever!"

The Dual Top Wenger By Eco Bottle Water bottle

The features I love about the bottle:


First - It's pure aluminum and so the water tastes amazing out of it.  No plastic taste at all! 

Second - The dual top feature is revolutionary in my opinion!  The bottle starts as a wide mouthed bottle - easy for cleaning and filling.  You can add ice to your water or fill your bottle with powders, fruit chunks, smoothies, etc. Then you screw on the first lid  that you will drink out of.  Now you have a narrow mouthed bottle that's easier for drinking out of.  Finally, there is a tiny stopper that you screw on top with just a half twist.  It seals tightly with no leaking - at all!

Third -  Did I mention - it does not leak!!  This is because of the patented triple lock system.  It's a quick triple thread that seals the bottle in just half a twist.  I love that you only need to do half a twist to close the stopper on top.  With other bottles of the same design you have to twist, and twist some more, and more... - always wondering if you screwed the cap on tight enough.  I can actually twist the cap on while driving and it's easy enough to do between songs in my fitness classes when I have just seconds to grab a drink.

Fourth - The water bottle fits my bicycle water bottle holder, my car's cup holders,  and the pouches on my backpacks.  I can't say the same for my Nalgene bottles.  It's also not so tall that it tips easily.  Other bottles may hold more liquid but tip over easily when I go around corners in my car. 

Finally, I love  the coating on the lid that you drink out of.  I've had bottles of this kind before where the mouth piece was aluminum and I didn't like the way it felt against my mouth.  This bottle has a hard plastic-like coating on the mouth piece (BPA free) that is divine to drink from.

Technical Specs:

  • The bottles are 100%  BPA free (including the liner) and made from pure aluminum.  
  • The stoppers are made of imported poyphrophylene PP and tehrmoplast TPR. (That means everything about the bottle is safe)
  • The body is made from a single piece of aluminum with no seem - meaning bacteria can't collect around the seem
  • The bottles are dishwasher safe
  • The sport top bottles can handle carbonated beverages
  • The bottle is fully recyclable
  • The bottles come in four colours (red, yellow, black and white)

Overall, I have only suggestion for Wenger by Eco Bottle for future bottles:

I would love to see more colours and patterns on the bottles.  My Sport Top Bottle is black with a picture of a Swiss army knife on it.  It's not very feminine.  My bright yellow Dual Top Bottle is much better but still, it has a logo that says "Patagonian Expedition Race" on it which is great for the mountains, less so if I just want a pretty water bottle to take to the gym.  I'm thinking hot pink or bright orange with flowers or something would be more in line with my tastes anyway.



Where can you get your bottle?

Good news for Canadians - London Drugs is carrying these incredible bottles.  You don't need to order them, pay shipping for them, or go to a specialty shop.  And they're only listed at $20 on the website.  That's reasonable for such a high quality bottle that you'll use for years in my opinion.
For more information go to the Wenger by Eco Bottle website.

If you don't live near a London Drugs, shipping information can be found on the website as well should you need to go that route.  



Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Mama Can Still Climb

How often do you talk to moms who used to climb?  Used to hike, used to have big mountain adventures, used to… You can fill in the blank.  It could be anything from paddling to backpacking, mountain biking, to skiing.  The point is, we women give up a lot when we have kids.  We sacrifice everything for the well-being of our children, our families, and for what we think our expected roll in life should be.

To read the rest of the story, please visit  Women's Adventure Magazine  to read my first story that was posted this week.

Below are some of my favourite photos from our annual summer climbing trip this July.  This year we climbed Mt. Gordon from our comfortable base camp at the Alpine Club of Canada's Bow Hut. 


Bow Lake at the beginning of the trip

The Bow Hut

Ascending Mt. Gordon
Approaching the Summit Ridge (Photo:  Cam Schaus)

On the summit of Mt. Gordon

My amazing husband who supports me in all my adventures

Stream crossing on the way out (Photo:  Cam Schaus)




Sunday, August 19, 2012

Learning to love camping: It's all about style

This may come as a shock to readers who've been following all of my camping posts this summer, but I actually didn't like camping until this year.  I loved hiking, climbing, adventure, and travelling  but at the end of the day I've always wanted to be in my own bed after having a hot shower and a meal that did not consist of hot dogs.  If my own bed wasn't available I still wanted an actual bed - off the ground - with sheets.

So what changed?  How did I go from hating camping to absolutely loving it - to the point of wanting to go every weekend?  I discovered my camping style!  And I'm not talking about cute curtains on RV windows or designer outdoor fashion.  I'm talking about the method in which you camp.  Before having a child, our style was always extreme minimalist.  We slept in a tiny two person backpacking tent.  Sometimes we camped in an official campground but more often than not we pulled into trailhead parking lots late in the evening, crawled into the back of our truck to sleep, and woke early to start a hike or climb.  On road trips, we'd pull off onto gravel backcountry roads and do the same, sleeping in the truck so we could get on the road nice and early again in the morning.  We'd use gas station bathrooms, grab coffee in the nearest town, and cook breakfast on a picnic table at day-use area.  That was our camping style.

Our first tent

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Playing Tourist in Banff National Park

Being a local from Calgary, there are places I know NOT to visit in Banff National Park in the middle of summer.  I'm sure there are billboards across Asia and Europe telling people that they should visit the World Famous Johnston Canyon when they come to Canada!  And Explore Rockies does an amazing job at getting the word out that their tours across Lake Minnewanka, up Sulphur Mt. and on the Athabasca Glacier will blow your mind.  Hence, we tend to avoid many of these beautiful places in favour of finding quieter trails, less crowded summits, or lakes that we can paddle on our own steam.

The Upper Falls at Johnston Canyon

That being said, we were given the opportunity to play tourist for a day when I won a Brewster Travel Package last winter after entering a contest I discovered through Twitter. If you have a Twitter account and plan to visit the Canadian Rockies, I highly encourage you to follow @ExploreRockies for other great contests in the future and to find out about family-friendly deals on their tours.  Right now for example, you can get a child's ticket for free if you pledge to "Unplug and explore" this summer.  (Alberta residents only)

The tour I won involved a full day of travel on a bus across Banff National Park - which with a three year old in tow, didn't sound like much fun.  Brewster Staff were amazing though and offered me tickets for their top three attractions in exchange:  The Lake Minnewanka Boat Tour, The Columbia Icefields Snow Coach Tour, and the Gondola ride up Sulphur Mt.  It was a no-brainer for me and I was super excited!  I was given three adult tickets and since preschoolers are free, it meant I could always bring a couple friends or family members with me on the trips.  My mother was thrilled when I told her I'd be able to take her up the gondola and on the boat cruise - two things she'd never gotten to do before.  I was ecstatic that I'd be able to take my son on all these tours - tours that for a local are an absolute indulgence; Locals just don't typically splurge on this kind of sightseeing.  We have to climb mountains instead of riding gondolas up them.  We have to canoe across lakes rather than being whisked across on a comfortable boat cruise.  And if we want to walk on a glacier, we get out our crampons, rope, climbing equipment - and leave the kids with grandparents!

We plan to do our snow coach tour in late September when we are out that way but we've already done both the boat tour and the gondola ride.  And what fabulous experiences they were!!  I wish more locals could have the opportunity to partake in these luxury tours.  

Lake Minnewanka

I took my mom with me on the boat tour across Lake Minnewanka and my son was thrilled with the experience.  We aren't really water people so he hadn't been in a boat before.  I'd never been on the boat tour either and was happy to finally see the famous Devil's Gap at the far end of the lake.  I'd heard tales of this beautiful place and wanted to see it with my own eyes.  The ride was about an hour long and we got to ride in a covered boat that protected us from the sun.  Being more adventurous in nature, I would have enjoyed a ride in an open boat more, but it was perfect for my mother and son.

Devil's Gap, Lake Minnewanka

Noah standing out on the back of the boat

Looking out at Cascade Mt. from inside the boat

We finished the day off with some sightseeing along the Lake Minnewanka Loop Road.  We hiked the easy Lower Bankhead Trail to see the remains of an old Coal mining operation and we stopped for some water play at The Cascade Ponds.  My son loved the hike because of the old coal shuttle train that we found along the trail.  My mom loved the whole "history" aspect.  I thought it was a pretty place with lovely views across open meadows.  As for the Ponds, it was probably the highlight of the day for my three-year-old who loves water!!  The water wasn't warm but it was warm enough to splash and wade in.  (and I did see some people full on swimming.)  Fortunately, I had planned ahead and brought sand toys in the car as well.  For more great picnic areas, swimming holes, and day trip ideas check out my resource Guide on The Best Day Trips and Picnic Sites.

Investigating the Coal Shuttle Train on the Lower Bankhead Trail

Meadows on the Lower Bankhead Trail
Cascade Ponds

 

Sulphur Mountain Gondola Ride

Last week we headed out to Banff again for our Gondola Ride up Sulphur Mountain, located right in the town of Banff.  In addition to bringing my mom and son, I brought a girlfriend along this time with her two boys.  The six of us all managed to fit into one gondola car for the 15 minute ride up to the top station.  From there it was a 30 minute hike (at a preschooler's pace) to the very top of the mountain where we found an old observatory and many friendly squirrels - note to other visitors, don't leave your goldfish and cheerios unattended!  We had perfect weather and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves looking down on the beautiful town of Banff.  I hadn't been up the gondola in years and it was a very nice treat for me.  The boys will remember their first gondola ride for a long time!

The boys reaching the top of Sulphur Mt.


Noah and Grandma making their way down from the Observatory on top of Sulphur Mt.

The boys heading back towards the Upper Gondola Terminal

We rounded out our day with a trip to Quarry Lake in Canmore for some swimming - a recurring theme and popular way for us to finish day trips on hot days!  Quarry Lake has the best beach hands down in the Rockies and is awesome for small kids.  Small rock pools line the beach creating natural wading pools.  You'll also find nice mud pools along the edge of the lake which are always popular with the kids.  Just don't expect to have the beach to yourself!  It might be a bit of a local's secret but the locals come out in force on hot days.

Quarry Lake, Canmore

 

Johnston Canyon

This popular tourist attraction doesn't require a ticket and you won't have to win a contest to afford the trip.  That being said, I wish they did give out tickets for the day to get on the trail because my goodness, does it ever get busy in Summer!!  My girlfriend and I (with our preschoolers) decided to hike the canyon last week when rain chased us away from another objective.  I knew it would be busy but I had no idea that cars would be lined up and down Hwy 1A in both directions on either side of the over-filled parking lot.  There was so much bug spray in the canyon from the visiting tourists that at times I really couldn't breathe for inhaling it.

Highway 1A at the entrance to Johnston Canyon

Crowded trail and parking lot aside, it is a fabulous hike and if you complete the 5.4km return hike to the Upper Falls you'll be rewarded with a 30m high set of gorgeous waterfalls that are among the most beautiful in the Rockies.  Along the way you'll pass the Lower Falls that are also stunning and very powerful if you squeeze your way through the cave in front of them to get an up close and personal look.  Both of our kids hiked the full distance - so proud of them, and they absolutely loved  the trail!  Yes it has waterfalls and smaller cascades every kilometre or so but it also has these metal catwalks and bridges that you walk on for about 60% of the distance.  Traversing the narrow walls of a canyon on a metal catwalk is pretty exciting for a youngster.  Heck, I find it interesting and fun myself and I'm hardly young anymore.

A rare moment where Noah had one of the cat walks to himself
Traversing high above the canyon bottom on the catwalks
The Lower Falls with the cave you can go through to see them up close

One of the narrow spots in the canyon

Noah and his friend chasing each other along the catwalks

My general opinion of this hiking trail:  Stunningly beautiful, worth pushing your way through the crowds, super fun for kids and a great way to motivate them to like hiking - BUT, much better in shoulder season (early or late season.)

A big thank you to the friends who joined me on these trips and to Explore Rockies for making two of the trips possible.  Playing tourist close to home is fun and luxurious.  I can't wait for our Snow Coach Tour in September.






Sunday, August 12, 2012

The Down and Dirty Guide to Camping With Kids - Book Review


I received a copy of Helen Olsson’s new book, The Down and Dirty Guide to Camping With Kids, at the beginning of camping season here in Canada and I can’t believe it’s almost mid-August already!  I figured it was about time I get my book review written and let you all know why you absolutely must buy this book before next year.  Buy it now, put it on your Christmas List, or make a note to get it while you plan out next season’s camping trips – just make sure you go grab yourself a copy because this kind of resource guide for families who love camping is unparalleled.



Friday, August 10, 2012

The Great Outdoors: Explore it, Love it and Respect it - Guest Post


Karen contacted me a couple months ago about sharing some stories with my readers.  I liked her first story on bear safety so much, I'd like to share another one of her great stories with you today.  Follow the link to read her previous story, Bears:  Don't put yourself and your loved ones at risk.
 

Green is the prime color of the world, and that from which its loveliness arises.” - Pedro Calderon de la Barca.

Beautiful Child Outdoors (Credit:  Photodune by Xilius)

So much can be learned from nature if we choose to learn from it and share our knowledge. As a child, I always loved exploring the woods, picking flowers, climbing trees and running as fast as I could through fields. As fun as this was, no one told me I was trampling over thickets that may never grow again or picking rare flowers that only bloomed once a year. I had no idea how destructive my ways were.

As a devoted aunt, I strive to teach the children to always leave no trace and you can too. I know what I loved as a child and there were definitely other ways I could have enjoyed nature. As an avid hiker, explorer and photographer, I have seen destruction at its worst—from cutting down trees for no use to areas littered with debris for no rhyme or reason. The best part of nature, the part most of us want to see, is nature untouched—beautiful flowers, tons of greenery and the occasional pristine waterfall, clear with visible fish. But if we touch it, leave debris, cut down trees or pick flowers, who can enjoy it after us? Who will see it the way you originally did? No one.

I want my nieces and nephews to enjoy nature and see it for what it really is. Leaving no trace means we are doing everything we can to reduce our impact on the environment. The following are a few examples of leaving no trace we can all try the next time we choose to explore the great outback with our children: 

          Look, but don’t touch. Instead of picking rare flowers with my tykes, we take pictures of them and make a scrapbook later. Instead of running through fields or the forest, we stay on marked trails and use binoculars to see what treasures lie beyond. Often times, we’re lucky enough to see wild animals, like deer or bear cubs, but had we entered the forest, we may have scared them away. Let’s not forget, when we leave marked trails, we’re also increasing our risk for getting lost.

          Help sustain vegetation.  Stay on marked paths and trails when possible and if you’re camping, be sure to camp on areas free of vegetation, like dirt. Camping on dirt is usually smoother, which means less sticks or rocks on your back when you sleep. If you have children like me, being in areas clear of vegetation also helps ensure our children don’t stumble into any rattlesnake holes or other traces of animal life, and of course, areas free of vegetation mean we aren’t hurting the environment by walking over new growth.  

          Don’t feed the wildlife. Leaving no trace is all about reducing our impact on the environment. Although feeding little critters seems like a generous thing to do, the critters then begin to rely on humans for food and during the winter, when less people are in the woods, how will our little friend survive?

          Always practice fire safety. It’s easy for fires to get out of hand, so always use designated fire facilities. If no facilities are available, Explore Alberta Parks recommends you make your fire “away from dry grass, heavy bush, logs, leaves or overhanging branches.” To be even more cautious, I always use a portable propane unit such as a campfire in a can. The reviews on this unit gets high scores for a reason. They are portable, easy to use, and a great way to leave no trace since the can comes home with you for future use. Camping without a campfire is always an option too, but the little ones always want those marshmallows and I bet yours do too.

Nature is all about respect. Respect what you see and leave it for others to love and enjoy as well. I know my nieces and nephews always love nature and have their scrapbooks to remember our adventures by. The next time you plan a fun exploration, keep these easy suggestions in mind to ensure it is fun for everyone who comes along after you.


Bio
Karen has been a wilderness explorer since childhood and spends much of her time teaching children to leave no trace while they are outdoors. When she’s not out exploring, you can find her making some amazing meals on her outdoor cooking fire pit. You can read the campfire in a can review and other reviews on environmentally safe fire pits at http://www.familyfirepit.com


Tuesday, August 07, 2012

How to fit 7 people in a canoe - Backcountry Adventures in Kananaskis

Last weekend we headed out on our annual family backpacking trip and this time we decided to shake things up a bit.  Rather than bringing Chariots to help ferry gear (and kids) we decided to bring canoes.  Two canoes to be exact.  Along with 7 adults, 1 teenager, 3 preschoolers, 1 toddler, a dog, and a backcountry cat.  Yep, you read that right - our friends brought their cat!  Isn't that the coolest thing (or strangest anyway) you've ever heard of?  I was skeptical at first, but the cat was right at home running around the campground, feasted on fresh mice all night long, and never strayed too far away  from our campsites.  Kitter Kat had no problems riding in an open canoe and other than startling my husband one night while he was off in the trees brushing his teeth, caused no problems.

A classic Canadian moment, our family paddling on Upper Kananaskis Lake

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Family Camping Super Guide

I've collaborated with some amazing outdoor blogging moms to bring you this Super Guide.  We've each chosen one of our favourite camping posts that we'd like to share with you this week.  I will also post a link to my most successful camping story, Preschool Adventures, which has had over 1000 views so far.  That tells me that there is some serious interest in family camping!  Try to get into a campground this weekend without a reservation and you'll also get a good taste of just how popular camping is with families.  And as hard as it is to try and find a campsite these days, I'm thrilled that families actually want to get outside together and spend a weekend outdoors.  Family time is growing increasingly rare with busy work schedules, backyards that need care, larger houses that don't clean themselves, sports practices, shopping, errands, to-do lists a mile long, birthday parties... - the list could go on forever.  So, Yay to all you families planning to take time out this summer to play, sleep, explore, and camp together - as a family.  Today's post is for you.

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